This four CD set presentation comprising all four of the original Harpers Bizarre albums; "Feelin' Groovy", "Anything Goes", "The Secret Life of Harpers Bizarre", and "Harpers Bizarre 4", augmented by single A & B sides in chronological order of release. The charmingly understated, slightly baroque, endlessly listenable Harpers Bizarre were one of the most important harmony vocal groups of the 1960s. Their cultured interpretation of Paul Simon's '59th Street Bridge Song (Feelin' Groovy)' is among the recordings that define the most golden of eras in popular music. Between 1967 and 1969, under the auspices of producer Lenny Waronker, they created four delightful, intelligent, unique sounding albums of what broadly has become known as Sunshine Pop, with contributions from such dashing young American writers and arrangers as Randy Newman, Van Dyke Parks and Leon Russell. The Beach Boys 'Good Vibrations' was one of the handful of recordings that revolutionised popular music during the 1960s. The enormity of it's influence cannot be overstated. Waronker had it in mind while recording "Feelin' Groovy" - thinking in terms of layering vocals - creating a memorable arrangement of woodwinds and voices. Lead vocalists Ted Templeman and Dick Scoppettone were backed by members of the Wrecking Crew, an aggregation of some of the most sought after Los Angeles session musicians of the day, including the guitarist Glen Campbell, bassist Carol Kaye, and the drummer Jim Gordon. 'Feelin' Groovy' caught the public ear and quickly entered the lower reaches of the Billboard Hot 100, peaking in April 1967 at #13 on the Hot 100 and #4 on the Easy Listening chart. The subsequent album was released by Warner at almost the precise moment the single reached maximum popularity. It combined the talents of a small group of brilliant young American songwriters; Randy Newman, Leon Russell, and the the 22-year-old wunderkind, Van Dyke Parks, who had been working with Brian Wilson on "SMiLE", and with Lenny Waronker on his own monumental album, "SONG CYCLE". To Harpers Bizarre's debut album Parks' contributed the breezy opener, 'Come to the Sunshine'. The Second album, 'Anything Goes', was another highly original pop creation; a panorama of, and tribute to, the musical styles of the past century. It included Randy Newman's ethereal "Snow" and a dreamy interpretation of Van Dyke Park's 'High Coin'. Released as singles, 'Chattanooga Choo-Choo' and 'Anything Goes', despite only making a small impression on the Top 50, reached Numbers 1 & 6 respectively on the Billboard Easy Listening chart. Another skilfully constructed piece of musical architecture, THE SECRET LIFE OF HARPERS BIZARRE, yielded only a minor hit in "The Battle of New Orleans", but It has many high points, including the Bacharach-David novelty, "Me, Japanese Boy" to which Harpers Bizarre bring all of the composition's innate tenderness and sensuality to the surface. Similarly, the Roger Nichols-Paul Williams composition 'The Drifter', originally featured on "Small Circle Of Friends", where Harpers' present a lush, angelic response to Nichols' masterful statement. A Templeman-Scoppettone original, the joyful 'Mad' epitomises the Harpers Bizarre attitude of those days. The diverse "Harpers Bizarre 4" includes versions of Lennon & McCartney's 'Blackbird' and John Denver's 'Leaving on A Jet Plane' and 'I Love You, Alice B Toklas' an extraordinary playful piece of Hollywood pop psychedelia from the very funny film of the same name. Quite complex music; shades of Ravi Shankar, Eric Dolphy and the Beatles at Jimmy Webb's MacArthur Park. And the Harpers voices are splendidly effective. Also released as a single, it's one of the finest examples of pure psychedelia for those who feel that genuine article is something more enigmatic than rock. Harpers Bizarre were special. With Lenny Waronker they made meticulously crafted records that were a testament to the advances made in sound production and conceptualisation of pop in the sixties. Ted Templeman thought Lenny was a genius. Evidently working with him was a singular apprenticeship that paved the way for his own career as a sound producer, which has found him working with, amongst others, Van Morrison, Captain Beefheart, Little Feat, Van Halen and The Doobie Brothers.
 This four CD set presentation comprising all four of the original Harpers Bizarre albums; "Feelin' Groovy", "Anything Goes", "The Secret Life of Harpers Bizarre", and "Harpers Bizarre 4", augmented by single A & B sides in chronological order of release. The charmingly understated, slightly baroque, endlessly listenable Harpers Bizarre were one of the most important harmony vocal groups of the 1960s. Their cultured interpretation of Paul Simon's '59th Street Bridge Song (Feelin' Groovy)' is among the recordings that define the most golden of eras in popular music. Between 1967 and 1969, under the auspices of producer Lenny Waronker, they created four delightful, intelligent, unique sounding albums of what broadly has become known as Sunshine Pop, with contributions from such dashing young American writers and arrangers as Randy Newman, Van Dyke Parks and Leon Russell. The Beach Boys 'Good Vibrations' was one of the handful of recordings that revolutionised popular music during the 1960s. The enormity of it's influence cannot be overstated. Waronker had it in mind while recording "Feelin' Groovy" - thinking in terms of layering vocals - creating a memorable arrangement of woodwinds and voices. Lead vocalists Ted Templeman and Dick Scoppettone were backed by members of the Wrecking Crew, an aggregation of some of the most sought after Los Angeles session musicians of the day, including the guitarist Glen Campbell, bassist Carol Kaye, and the drummer Jim Gordon. 'Feelin' Groovy' caught the public ear and quickly entered the lower reaches of the Billboard Hot 100, peaking in April 1967 at #13 on the Hot 100 and #4 on the Easy Listening chart. The subsequent album was released by Warner at almost the precise moment the single reached maximum popularity. It combined the talents of a small group of brilliant young American songwriters; Randy Newman, Leon Russell, and the the 22-year-old wunderkind, Van Dyke Parks, who had been working with Brian Wilson on "SMiLE", and with Lenny Waronker on his own monumental album, "SONG CYCLE". To Harpers Bizarre's debut album Parks' contributed the breezy opener, 'Come to the Sunshine'. The Second album, 'Anything Goes', was another highly original pop creation; a panorama of, and tribute to, the musical styles of the past century. It included Randy Newman's ethereal "Snow" and a dreamy interpretation of Van Dyke Park's 'High Coin'. Released as singles, 'Chattanooga Choo-Choo' and 'Anything Goes', despite only making a small impression on the Top 50, reached Numbers 1 & 6 respectively on the Billboard Easy Listening chart. Another skilfully constructed piece of musical architecture, THE SECRET LIFE OF HARPERS BIZARRE, yielded only a minor hit in "The Battle of New Orleans", but It has many high points, including the Bacharach-David novelty, "Me, Japanese Boy" to which Harpers Bizarre bring all of the composition's innate tenderness and sensuality to the surface. Similarly, the Roger Nichols-Paul Williams composition 'The Drifter', originally featured on "Small Circle Of Friends", where Harpers' present a lush, angelic response to Nichols' masterful statement. A Templeman-Scoppettone original, the joyful 'Mad' epitomises the Harpers Bizarre attitude of those days. The diverse "Harpers Bizarre 4" includes versions of Lennon & McCartney's 'Blackbird' and John Denver's 'Leaving on A Jet Plane' and 'I Love You, Alice B Toklas' an extraordinary playful piece of Hollywood pop psychedelia from the very funny film of the same name. Quite complex music; shades of Ravi Shankar, Eric Dolphy and the Beatles at Jimmy Webb's MacArthur Park. And the Harpers voices are splendidly effective. Also released as a single, it's one of the finest examples of pure psychedelia for those who feel that genuine article is something more enigmatic than rock. Harpers Bizarre were special. With Lenny Waronker they made meticulously crafted records that were a testament to the advances made in sound production and conceptualisation of pop in the sixties. Ted Templeman thought Lenny was a genius. Evidently working with him was a singular apprenticeship that paved the way for his own career as a sound producer, which has found him working with, amongst others, Van Morrison, Captain Beefheart, Little Feat, Van Halen and The Doobie Brothers.
5013929335639

Details

Format: CD
Label: EL RECORDS
Rel. Date: 03/26/2021
UPC: 5013929335639

Come To The Sunshine: Complete Warner Brothers
Artist: Harpers Bizarre
Format: CD
New: Available $42.99
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Available Formats and Editions

DISC: 1

1. Come To The Sunshine
2. Happy Talk
3. Come Love
4. Raspberry Rug
5. 59th Street Bridge Song (Feelin' Groovy)
6. The Debutante's Ball
7. Happyland
8. Peter And The Wolf
9. I Can Hear The Darkness
10. Simon Smith And The Amazing Dancing Bear
11. 11 Lost My Love Today
12. 12 Bye, Bye, Bye
13. This Is Only The Beginning
14. Anything Goes
15. Two Little Babes In The Wood
16. The Biggest Night Of Her Life
17. Pocketful Of Miracles
18. Snow
19. Chattanooga Choo Choo
20. Hey, You In The Crowd
21. Louisiana Man
22. Milord
23. Virginia City
24. Jessie
25. You Need A Change
26. High Coin
27. Malibu U
28. Cotton Candy Sandman (Sandman's Coming)
29. Look To The Rainbow
30. Battle Of New Orleans
31. When I Was A Cowboy
32. Sentimental Journey (Interlude)
33. Sentimental Journey
34. Las Mananitas
35. Medley: Bye, Bye, Bye / Vine Street
36. Me, Japanese Boy
37. I'll Build A Stairway To Paradise (Interlude)
38. I'll Build A Stairway To Paradise
39. Green Apple Tree
40. Sit Down You're Rocking The Boat
41. I Love You, Mama (Interlude)
42. I Love You, Mama
43. Funny How Love Can Be
44. Mad
45. Look To The Rainbow
46. The Drifter
47. The Drifter (Reprise)
48. Both Sides Now
49. Small Talk
50. Soft Soundin' Music
51. Knock On Wood
52. Witchi Tai To
53. Hard To Handle
54. When The Band Begins To Play
55. Something Better
56. Blackbird
57. I Love You, Alice B. Toklas
58. There's No Time Like Today
59. All Through The Night
60. Cotton Candy Sandman
61. Leaving On A Jet Plane
62. Poly High
63. If We Ever Needed The Lord Before

More Info:

 This four CD set presentation comprising all four of the original Harpers Bizarre albums; "Feelin' Groovy", "Anything Goes", "The Secret Life of Harpers Bizarre", and "Harpers Bizarre 4", augmented by single A & B sides in chronological order of release. The charmingly understated, slightly baroque, endlessly listenable Harpers Bizarre were one of the most important harmony vocal groups of the 1960s. Their cultured interpretation of Paul Simon's '59th Street Bridge Song (Feelin' Groovy)' is among the recordings that define the most golden of eras in popular music. Between 1967 and 1969, under the auspices of producer Lenny Waronker, they created four delightful, intelligent, unique sounding albums of what broadly has become known as Sunshine Pop, with contributions from such dashing young American writers and arrangers as Randy Newman, Van Dyke Parks and Leon Russell. The Beach Boys 'Good Vibrations' was one of the handful of recordings that revolutionised popular music during the 1960s. The enormity of it's influence cannot be overstated. Waronker had it in mind while recording "Feelin' Groovy" - thinking in terms of layering vocals - creating a memorable arrangement of woodwinds and voices. Lead vocalists Ted Templeman and Dick Scoppettone were backed by members of the Wrecking Crew, an aggregation of some of the most sought after Los Angeles session musicians of the day, including the guitarist Glen Campbell, bassist Carol Kaye, and the drummer Jim Gordon. 'Feelin' Groovy' caught the public ear and quickly entered the lower reaches of the Billboard Hot 100, peaking in April 1967 at #13 on the Hot 100 and #4 on the Easy Listening chart. The subsequent album was released by Warner at almost the precise moment the single reached maximum popularity. It combined the talents of a small group of brilliant young American songwriters; Randy Newman, Leon Russell, and the the 22-year-old wunderkind, Van Dyke Parks, who had been working with Brian Wilson on "SMiLE", and with Lenny Waronker on his own monumental album, "SONG CYCLE". To Harpers Bizarre's debut album Parks' contributed the breezy opener, 'Come to the Sunshine'. The Second album, 'Anything Goes', was another highly original pop creation; a panorama of, and tribute to, the musical styles of the past century. It included Randy Newman's ethereal "Snow" and a dreamy interpretation of Van Dyke Park's 'High Coin'. Released as singles, 'Chattanooga Choo-Choo' and 'Anything Goes', despite only making a small impression on the Top 50, reached Numbers 1 & 6 respectively on the Billboard Easy Listening chart. Another skilfully constructed piece of musical architecture, THE SECRET LIFE OF HARPERS BIZARRE, yielded only a minor hit in "The Battle of New Orleans", but It has many high points, including the Bacharach-David novelty, "Me, Japanese Boy" to which Harpers Bizarre bring all of the composition's innate tenderness and sensuality to the surface. Similarly, the Roger Nichols-Paul Williams composition 'The Drifter', originally featured on "Small Circle Of Friends", where Harpers' present a lush, angelic response to Nichols' masterful statement. A Templeman-Scoppettone original, the joyful 'Mad' epitomises the Harpers Bizarre attitude of those days. The diverse "Harpers Bizarre 4" includes versions of Lennon & McCartney's 'Blackbird' and John Denver's 'Leaving on A Jet Plane' and 'I Love You, Alice B Toklas' an extraordinary playful piece of Hollywood pop psychedelia from the very funny film of the same name. Quite complex music; shades of Ravi Shankar, Eric Dolphy and the Beatles at Jimmy Webb's MacArthur Park. And the Harpers voices are splendidly effective. Also released as a single, it's one of the finest examples of pure psychedelia for those who feel that genuine article is something more enigmatic than rock. Harpers Bizarre were special. With Lenny Waronker they made meticulously crafted records that were a testament to the advances made in sound production and conceptualisation of pop in the sixties. Ted Templeman thought Lenny was a genius. Evidently working with him was a singular apprenticeship that paved the way for his own career as a sound producer, which has found him working with, amongst others, Van Morrison, Captain Beefheart, Little Feat, Van Halen and The Doobie Brothers.