Twist And Shout

While touring in support of his 2007 release, Back East, Redman decided he wanted to continue exploring sax/bass/ drums trio format and started to compose new material with that often challenging configuration in mind. The result is COMPASS, a disc that Redman describes as 'a journey for me... an expansion on, and an extension of Back East.' Compass goes in an entirely new direction for Redman; it's an exhilarating leap into uncharted territory. Compass is nothing short of mesmerizing, it's conceptual risks paying off for musician and listener alike.
While touring in support of his 2007 release, Back East, Redman decided he wanted to continue exploring sax/bass/ drums trio format and started to compose new material with that often challenging configuration in mind. The result is COMPASS, a disc that Redman describes as 'a journey for me... an expansion on, and an extension of Back East.' Compass goes in an entirely new direction for Redman; it's an exhilarating leap into uncharted territory. Compass is nothing short of mesmerizing, it's conceptual risks paying off for musician and listener alike.
075597992304

Details

Format: CD
Label: NNS
Catalog: 510844
Rel. Date: 01/13/2009
UPC: 075597992304

Compass
Artist: Joshua Redman
Format: CD
New: Not in stock
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While touring in support of his 2007 release, Back East, Redman decided he wanted to continue exploring sax/bass/ drums trio format and started to compose new material with that often challenging configuration in mind. The result is COMPASS, a disc that Redman describes as 'a journey for me... an expansion on, and an extension of Back East.' Compass goes in an entirely new direction for Redman; it's an exhilarating leap into uncharted territory. Compass is nothing short of mesmerizing, it's conceptual risks paying off for musician and listener alike.

Reviews:

If Joshua Redman is no Sonny Rollins, he’s at least got the good taste to wish he was. He may even have the good taste to wish he were less tasteful, or at least to apparently realize that good taste is not what makes one the next Sonny Rollins. Or at least that’s what I gather from Compass, an equally witty and playful counterpart to last years terrific Back East.

Redman admitted to peeping about beneath the legs of the saxophone colossus on that previous record, an experiment with the piano-less saxophone trio that Rollins mastered years ago, and he revisits that format on Compass. Here, however, Redman mixes things up—five of these 13 tracks feature two bassists (Larry Grenadier and Reuben Rogers) and two drummers (Brian Blade and Gregory Hutchinson), while another two cuts feature both bassists.

Redman’s playing feels slightly less rambunctious, a shade more delicate, than on Back East, particularly in the case of "Moonlight," his take on "Moonlight Sonata." But his sax is no less playful, though it may have taken on some more sly manners than on the outing immediately previous. The fluttering soprano opening to "Ghost," for instance, is the equivalent of a sheet with two eyeholes, a lovely eastern melody. And there are plenty of titles so helpful here they may very well have preceded the compositions. "Insomnomaniac" is restless and repetitive, suggesting 3 a.m. floorboards paced with increasing speed and frustration, and the melody line of "Identity Thief" suggests a cat burglar of sorts. Redman has always had the chops to be a standard-bearer—the wit he’s developing with age is just a bonus.

        
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